Talk of the Nation on UPR Too

Weekdays at 2:00 p.m.

 

Each day, Talk of the Nation combines the award-winning resources of NPR News with the vital participation of listeners. The result is a spirited and productive exchange of knowledge and insight that delves deeply into the news and ideas of the day.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5187cb8be1c8712d266b00a1|5187cb66e1c8a892ebf2339a

Pages

NPR Story
11:00 am
Tue February 28, 2012

Interracial Marriage And The Extended Family

According to a study by the Pew Research Center, about 15 percent of new marriages in 2010 were between people of different races or ethnicities — nearly twice the rate from 30 years prior. Though interracial marriage is more mainstream, the unions may still cause tension among family members.

Food
11:00 am
Tue February 28, 2012

Chef Trotter Transitions From Kitchen To Classroom

Chef Charlie Trotter helped pioneer American fine dining at a time when French cuisine reigned on the food scene. After 25 years, Trotter will close his namesake restaurant — Charlie Trotter's — in Chicago, Ill., to pursue a Master's in philosophy and political theory.

From Our Listeners
11:00 am
Tue February 28, 2012

Letters: Va.'s Proposed Ultrasound Law, 'Rez Life'

NPR's John Donvan reads from listener comments on previous show topics including Virginia's proposed ultrasound law, preparing your pockets for a rainy day and reservation life.

NPR Story
11:00 am
Tue February 28, 2012

The Hidden Faces Of Modern Day Slavery

Slavery continues to exist across the United States in a number of forms. There are brothels, farms, nail salons and factories across the United States where people are working against their will, for no pay. A number of states are working on legislation to address human trafficking.

NPR Story
11:00 am
Tue February 28, 2012

Not Enough Hours In The Day?: How To Find More Time

Originally published on Tue February 28, 2012 2:22 pm

Transcript

JOHN DONVAN, HOST:

Free time, so how much of that do you have? Are you, say, too busy to breathe? Well, author Laura Vanderkam says that she used to be too busy to breathe until she figured out that most of us who don't think we have time to spare in a day are really only fooling ourselves, maybe even lying to ourselves. She says you're not that busy. Hmm. Are you? If you're convinced that you really are that busy, give us a call, maybe Laura can help you out and convince you otherwise.

Read more
Health Care
12:05 pm
Mon February 27, 2012

'Am I My Genes?': Fate, Family And Genetic Testing

Originally published on Tue February 28, 2012 12:13 pm

Advances in genetic testing have improved the prediction, diagnosis and treatment of disease. But having increased information about your genetic makeup can raise some difficult questions and decisions.

Read more
Education
11:00 am
Mon February 27, 2012

Affirmative Action: Is It Still Necessary?

In a 2003 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled to uphold affirmative action and said it expected that in 25 years, "the use of racial preferences will no longer be necessary." The court will hear a case involving race-conscious admissions at the University of Texas in the fall.

Opinion
11:00 am
Mon February 27, 2012

Op-Ed: It Seems Easier to Raise A Kid Alone

Originally published on Wed February 29, 2012 11:04 am

Transcript

JOHN DONVAN, HOST:

And now, The Opinion Page. Jessica Olien has neither a husband nor a child, but she would eventually like to have one without the other - meaning she wants to be a mom, but she does not want to be a wife. She intends when she has a child to raise it on her own, as her mother raised her without a man around. Her piece titled "I Want to be My Child's Only Parent" ran in the online magazine Slate. It was in response to new numbers that show that more than half of the children born to women under 30 are now born to single mothers.

Read more
Africa
11:00 am
Mon February 27, 2012

The World's Options For Aid In Somalia

Transcript

JOHN DONVAN, HOST:

The Somali Civil War that began in 1991 destroyed the country's agriculture; that led to widespread starvation and poverty, thousands of people died, warlords took over clans. The United States and other countries tried to help, but all efforts have failed. Now 20 years have gone by. And with piracy and the threat of terrorism from the group al-Shabab becoming a global problem, the British government held a summit last week in London with 55 delegations from Somalia and the international community.

Read more
NPR Story
11:00 am
Fri February 24, 2012

Powering Up...With A Microbial Fuel Cell

Reporting in Environmental Science and Technology, researchers write of harvesting electricity from microbe-rich river sediments--enough to power a small LED bulb. Grant Burgess, a marine biotechnologist at Newcastle University, discusses the hunt for electron-burping bugs.

Pages