All Things Considered

Weekdays 4:00 - 7:00 p.m.
Melissa Block, Michele Norris, Robert Siegel, Audie Cornish

Since its debut in 1971, this afternoon radio newsmagazine has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Heard by more than 11 million people on over 600 radio stations each week, All Things Considered is one of the most popular programs in America. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features. Andrea Seabrook hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

More information at All Things Considered.

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Movies I've Seen A Million Times
3:01 pm
Sun June 17, 2012

The Movie Whoopi Goldberg's 'Seen A Million Times'

Gregory Peck won the Academy Award for Best Actor for his 1962 performance in To Kill a Mockingbird.
AP

Originally published on Thu June 21, 2012 11:59 am

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen a Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

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London 2012: The Summer Olympics
3:01 pm
Sun June 17, 2012

Synch Or Swim: Olympic Duet Practices Togetherness

Mary Killman and Mariya Koroleva of the U.S. compete in the Olympic qualifiers in April in London. They'll compete together in the Olympics this summer.
Clive Rose Getty Images

Originally published on Sat June 23, 2012 3:42 pm

For the first time ever, the U.S. synchronized swimming team didn't qualify for the Summer Olympics. But two of its members, who until recently knew each other only as rivals, are going to London to compete in synchronized swimming duets — against duets that have been together for years.

Mary Killman, 21, and Mariya Koroleva, 22, became roommates early last year, training with the national team in Indianapolis. Previously, they had competed against each other in the San Francisco Bay Area.

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Around the Nation
3:01 pm
Sun June 17, 2012

One For The Road: Teen Builds Her Own Pontiac Fiero

14-year-old Kathryn DiMaria drilling door rivets in her Pontiac Fiero.
Courtesy of Jerry DiMaria

Originally published on Sat June 23, 2012 1:45 pm

When 38-year-old Jerry DiMaria isn't on the clock at Central Michigan University, you can usually find him working on his Corvette.

"I guess I've always probably been a little bit into cars, but even as a kid I thought it would be a lot of fun to rebuild a car with my dad," he said.

He never got that chance with his dad, but now he's getting it with his oldest daughter, Kathryn.

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Arts & Life
2:03 pm
Sun June 17, 2012

Chanticleer: A Botanical Distraction From Daily Life

Chanticleer is a historical estate and garden in Wayne, Pa., part of the old Main Line ring of estates around Philadelphia.
Courtesy of the Lyden family

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 1:19 pm

Ever wanted to just disappear into a secret garden of earthly delights, of twists and turns of evocative ruin, exuberant tropics, the Zen of a Japanese teahouse?

Consider Chanticleer, in Wayne, Pa. It's part of the old Main Line ring of estates around Philadelphia. In fact, right across the street from the garden is the former home of Helen Hope Montgomery Scott, the heiress portrayed by Katherine Hepburn in Philadelphia Story.

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Author Interviews
1:56 pm
Sun June 17, 2012

After War And Fame, Dad Is Author's Challenge

Anthony Swofford is the author of Jarhead: A Marine's Chronicle of the Gulf War and Other Battles, which was adapted into a film starring Jake Gyllenhaal as the author.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 18, 2012 5:47 am

Seven years ago, writer and former U.S. Marine Anthony Swofford had the success of a lifetime when his 2003 memoir Jarhead was turned into a high-budget Hollywood movie.

Swofford, then 35, had hit it big. But flush with cash and still grappling with post-war life, he suddenly found himself in the throes of a self-destructive rampage replete with drugs, alcohol and infidelity.

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Music Interviews
10:03 am
Sun June 17, 2012

Kate McGarry: A Singer Inspired By The Spoken Word

Kate McGarry's new album is titled Girl Talk.
Matteo Trisolini

Originally published on Thu June 21, 2012 9:01 am

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Around the Nation
3:30 pm
Sat June 16, 2012

State Of The Unions: Labor And The Middle Class

Occupy Wall Street protesters joined with unions in New York on May 1, a traditional day of global protests in sympathy with unions and leftist politics.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Sat June 16, 2012 7:05 pm

For many full-time employees in the United States, the five-day work week, paid overtime and holidays are expected benefits. This wasn't always so, and many workers' benefits today are the achievements of labor unions.

Just five decades ago, unions were on the frontline of the fight for the rights and wages of the middle class. But today, unions are on the decline.

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NPR Story
3:12 pm
Sat June 16, 2012

Gauging The Impact Of Obama's Immigration Policy

Originally published on Sat June 16, 2012 3:24 pm

President Obama announced major changes in the country's immigration policy on Friday. NPR's Mara Liasson talks with weekends on All Things Considered host Jacki Lyden about what the changes are and the political impact they may have this election season.

World
3:12 pm
Sat June 16, 2012

Egypt Faces Tense Election For New President

Originally published on Sat June 16, 2012 3:24 pm

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

In Egypt, voters went to the polls today to pick a new president to replace Hosni Mubarak, who was ousted in a revolution last year. Voters are casting ballots just a few days after that nation's highest court issued a ruling that dissolves Egypt's first freely elected parliament, which was dominated by Islamists. The latest election is a runoff between an Islamist engineer and Mubarak's last prime minister, the two top vote-getters in the first round of presidential polls held last month.

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Arts & Life
2:23 pm
Sat June 16, 2012

Embracing The Quirkiness Of Djuna Barnes

novels she's now known for, women's rights advocate Djuna Barnes was a journalist and illustrator." href="/post/embracing-quirkiness-djuna-barnes" class="noexit lightbox">
Before publishing the plays and novels she's now known for, women's rights advocate Djuna Barnes was a journalist and illustrator.
Djuna Barnes Papers, Special Collections, University of Maryland Libraries

Originally published on Sat June 16, 2012 5:06 pm

A writer, illustrator and provocateur in the Roaring '20s, Djuna Barnes stood out.

"She was much more interested in embracing the quirky and embracing that idea that became so famous in feminist circles half a century later," Catherine Morris says, "the idea that the personal is political."

Morris is the curator of a new exhibition of Barnes' writings and illustrations called "Newspaper Fictions" at the Brooklyn Museum's Sackler Center for Feminist Art.

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