Tom Williams

Program Director, Host Access Utah

Tom Williams worked as a part-time UPR announcer for a few years and joined Utah Public Radio full-time in 1996.  He is a proud graduate of Uintah High School in Vernal and Utah State University (B. A. in Liberal Arts and Master of Business Administration.)  He grew up in a family that regularly discussed everything from opera to religion to politics. He is interested in just about everything and loves to engage people in conversation, so you could say he has found the perfect job as host “Access Utah” and “Opera Saturday.”  He and his wife Becky, live in Logan.

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Access Utah
10:43 am
Wed October 16, 2013

5 Myths about Nuclear Weapons on Wednesday's Access Utah

Most of us think there’s nothing new to say about nuclear weapons. Yes, they’re horrible, possibly immoral, and definitely dangerous, but they feel necessary. If force is the final arbiter between nations, and nuclear bombs are the most powerful weapons, then we’re basically stuck with them. In his new book, “Five Myths About Nuclear Weapons.,” Ward Wilson says that much of what we believe about nuclear weapons is based on emotion and exaggeration.

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Programs
9:33 am
Tue October 15, 2013

Edward Schumacher-Matos on Tuesday's Access Utah

Credit npr.org

Edward Schumacher-Matos is the Ombudsman for NPR, dealing with issues of ethics, fairness and accuracy, media and society, and language. He joins Tom Williams to talk about some of the issues he has addressed recently: the patriotism of NPR and its sponsor Al Jazeera; questions of bias in NPR coverage of the Israeli-Palestinian divide; and whether NPR should use the term “Obamacare.” He will also talk about immigration, the fragmentation of media, the future of newspapers, the goals of NPR News, and relationships between NPR and its member stations.


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Access Utah
10:26 am
Mon October 14, 2013

Columbus Day Speculation on Monday's Access Utah

Today is Columbus Day. Towns and regions and one nation are named for the famed explorer. For many Native Americans Columbus was not a hero, but a “harbinger of genocide.” And the man himself is a complicated figure. Today my guest is Laurence Bergreen, author of “Columbus: The Four Voyages: 1492 to 1504” The New York Times says that “Laurence Bergreen’s Columbus was brilliant, audacious, volatile, paranoid, and ruthless. What emerges in this biography..is a surprising and revealing portrait of a man who might have been the title character in a Shakespearean tragedy.” Bergreen’s latest book will change everything you thought you knew about Columbus.

 

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Access Utah
10:10 am
Fri October 11, 2013

Shutdown Pains Utah on Thursday's Access Utah

It's been estimated that nearly 40,000 Utahns have been furloughed because of the government shutdown, programs like the Women’s Infant Care (WIC) are struggling to provide their services to mothers and their children, all six of Utah’s National Parks are closed, leaving surrounding businesses and towns fearful.


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Access Utah
10:50 am
Tue October 8, 2013

Extension Sustainability Summit on Wednesday's Access Utah

Credit http://wrdc.usu.edu/htm/programs/ess/

From October 2 to October 3, Park City hosted the Extension Sustainability Summit. The event brought in extension educators on sustainability from all across the nation, to discuss what major environmental sustainability programs are currently being delivered through Cooperative Extension and began talking about future goals.

Full Program

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Access Utah
6:11 pm
Mon October 7, 2013

Aspen's Roots on Tuesday's Access Utah

Credit en.wikipedia.org

What is it about the aspen tree that captures our imagination? The pleasant sound and sight of quaking leaves? Maybe aspen trees remind us of favorite mountain retreats? Perhaps it’s the fact that many aspen “groves” are really a single organism, sharing a massive root system. One such aspen, Pando, is one of the world’s oldest living organisms and lives in Fishlake National Forest in Utah. School children from Monroe have proposed that the aspen be named Utah’s state tree. Today on Access Utah we’ll explore all things aspen, from the scientific to the metaphorical.

 


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Access Utah
11:01 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Religous Pluralism with Dr. Marcella Hall on Monday's Access Utah

Credit Dr. Marcella Runell Hall

Dr. Marcella Runell Hall is a social justice scholar and author specializing in Diversity Education/Training, Spirituality/Religion, Race/Ethnicity, Hip-Hop Education, Social Justice and Critical Pedagogy.

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Access Utah
12:57 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

"Underground" on Thursday's Access Utah

Credit today.law.utah.edu

“Underground,” a new play by award-winning Utah playwright (and University of Utah Law Professor,) Debora Threedy, will have its World Premiere in Southern Utah, October 3-5 in the Kayenta Outdoor Theatre in Ivins. “Underground” addresses an especially important topic for many Utahns: the moral and spiritual dilemma of excavating Ancient Native American ancestral grounds and selling the excavated artifacts for financial gain. A similar scenario occurred a few years ago in Blanding, where many local residents were indicted for selling stolen Native American artifacts on the black market.


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Access Utah
3:31 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

World Reading Day on Wednesday's Access Utah

Wednesday is World Reading Day. It’s one day, held once a year, where people of all ages are encouraged to turn off the TV, log off the net, put away the video games & ignore all the other myriad distractions of modern life and enjoy the simple pleasure of reading a book instead. 

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Access Utah
9:15 pm
Mon September 30, 2013

Performing Arts for Prisoners on Tuesday's Access Utah

Prison Performing Arts founder and artistic director Agnes Wilcox.
Credit pulitzerarts.org

21 years ago in St. Louis, six correctional centers and juvenile detention centers began a program featuring incarcerated adults and children called Prison Performing Arts. Hardened criminals performing classic plays have provided fascinating insights into theater and life. As “This American Life” said of the Prison Performing Arts’ production of Hamlet in a St Louis penitentiary, “It’s a play about murder and its consequences, performed by murderers, living out the consequences.”

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