The Arab Spring: One Year Later
10:01 pm
Thu January 5, 2012

The Turkish Model: Can It Be Replicated?

Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan (right) has been enthusiastically received by Arab Spring countries that look to Turkey as a potential model. Here, Erdogan hosts Mustafa Abdul Jalil, chairman of the National Transitional Council of Libya, in Istanbul, last month.
Mustafa Ozer AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon January 9, 2012 9:09 am

In the Arab states that have ousted dictators and begun building new political and economic systems, many are looking to Turkey as an example of a modern, moderate Muslim state that works. Perhaps no country has seen its image in the Arab world soar as quickly as Turkey, a secular state that's run by a party with roots in political Islam. As part of our series on the Arab Spring and where it stands today, NPR's Peter Kenyon examines whether the "Turkish model" can be exported.

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All Songs Considered Blog
8:43 pm
Thu January 5, 2012

Music To Make You Move: Help NPR Create The Ultimate Workout Mix

Are you ready for another set? Clearly, we're pros at mixing music with getting in shape.
May-Ying Lam NPR

Originally published on Sat January 14, 2012 9:49 am

You know it because countless magazines have screamed it at you from the checkout line. Because the gym you walk past every morning is waiving its initiation fee. The holidays are over. It's time to get in shape. So pull on your gym shorts and tighten the laces on your running shoes.

Oh yeah, and don't forget your headphones. You're going to need some motivation, and nothing gets the job done like music. Need proof? We just happen to have some, courtesy of neuroscientist Robert Zatorre, who spoke with Morning Edition's Linda Wertheimer.

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StoryCorps
8:00 pm
Thu January 5, 2012

CEO Looks At A Veteran, Sees A Business Partner

Craig Williams (left) spoke with his business partner, Richard Bennett, at StoryCorps in Norristown, Pa.
StoryCorps

In 2008, Richard Bennett had been out of the Marines for nearly three years after being injured in Iraq. That's when he caught the attention of Craig Williams, who was looking for a partner to help expand his successful construction business in Norristown, Pa.

"I had developed a pretty solid construction company, and I wanted a partner," says Williams, 44. "As an African-American businessman, I wanted a young African-American soldier coming home. It seemed like a great opportunity to provide an opportunity."

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Radiolab

Radiolab believes your ears are a portal to another world. Where sound illuminates ideas, and the boundaries blur between science, philosophy, and human experience. Big questions are investigated, tinkered with, and encouraged to grow. Bring your curiosity, and we'll feed it with possibility.

It's All Politics
4:25 pm
Thu January 5, 2012

Five Days Before New Hampshire Primary, Confident Romney Ventures South

Former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum speaks during a campaign stop with college students Thursday in Concord, N.H.
Jim Cole Associated Press

Originally published on Thu January 5, 2012 4:53 pm

Most of the Republican presidential candidates are focused on New Hampshire, which holds its primary next Tuesday.

But while former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney began his day campaigning in New Hampshire, by the afternoon he was in South Carolina, which holds its primary Jan. 21.

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Utah News
4:09 pm
Thu January 5, 2012

USU Moab is in the Works

County officials declined to protest a south-corridor annexation proposed by Moab City. No protests by today’s deadline paves the way for Utah State University to build a campus along Highway 191.

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Martin Kaste is a correspondent on NPR's National desk. He covers the news throughout the Northwest, with an emphasis on technology and privacy stories.

In addition to general assignment reporting throughout the region, Kaste has contributed to NPR News coverage of major world events, including the 2010 earthquake in Haiti and the 2011 uprising in Libya.

Focusing on technology and privacy issues, Kaste has reported on the government's wireless wiretapping practices as well as the data-collection and analysis that goes on behind the scenes in social media and other new media. His privacy reporting was cited in a US Supreme Court opinion concerning GPS tracking.

Around the Nation
3:55 pm
Thu January 5, 2012

Sinking Ship? Saving The Historic Kalakala Ferry

Not Dead Yet: On July 3, 1935, the Kalakala started daily ferry service between Seattle and Bremerton, Wash. Today, it sits unused in a nearby Tacoma dock.
Martin Kaste NPR

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Utah News
3:50 pm
Thu January 5, 2012

Ogden officer killed in shoot-out that injured 5 other law enforcement members

Utah authorities say the suspect injured in a shoot-out with police in Ogden is a 37-year-old man with a limited criminal history.

Ogden police say Matthew David Stewart suffered injuries that are not life-threatening in the shooting Wednesday evening that killed one officer and wounded five others. The officer killed, Jared Francom, was with the Ogden police department. He had a wife and two yound children. Stewart is in a hospital under guard.

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Utah News
3:30 pm
Thu January 5, 2012

Dan Liljenquist Announces Intention to Run for U.S. Senate Seat

Dan Liljenquist, former Utah State Senator representing the Davis County area, made an important announcement on Wednesday. Mr. Liljenquist, who was named public official of the year by the national government watchdog magazine, Governing, talked to UPR's Chris Holmes about his decision to run for a seat in the United States Senate.

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