Access Utah
3:42 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Homelessness - Join our Discussion on Wednesday

Our topic Wednesday is homelessness.  Tom Williams’ guests will include Pamela Atkinson, a leading advocate for Utah’s homeless, and Leon Anderson, Head of the Department of Sociology, Social Work, and Anthropology at Utah State University and coauthor of Down on Their Luck: A Study of Homeless Street People.  He’ll give the Timepiece titled: “Criminalization of Mental Illness and the Promise of Mental Health Courts” at USU's College of Humanities and Social Sciences’ Kiger Hour on Thursday in Logan.

UPR News Feature
3:34 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Women's History Month, Part III: What It Means to Be a Woman in Academia

March is women's history month, and the national theme Women's Education, Women's Empowerment is applicable not just to students, but also to women in academia. Storee Powell talks with Utah State University's Dr. Christy Glass, a gender scholar and researcher, who not only studies the struggles of women entering academia, but experiences it first-hand as a female associate professor.

Commentary
3:27 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Steve Eaton Spends a Day in Mitt's Shoes

Mitt's been in such a good mood lately...Steve doesn't want to be around when he finds out he doesn't get to be president. Still, he feels a little bit sorry for him and is willing to bet you $10,000 that you wouldn't want to be him.

Author Interviews
3:16 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

'Shoah' Director Details Memoirs In 'Patagonian Hare'

Claude Lanzmann published his memoir, Le Lièvre de Patagonie, in France in 2009. The Patagonian Hare has now been translated into English.
Helie Gallimar Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Seventy years ago, in the middle of World War II, a couple of hundred miles north of Toulouse, Claude Lanzmann was a high school student — and an assimilated French Jew. Every day he faced the risk of arrest.

When Lanzmann was a teenager, both he and his father independently joined the Communist Resistance. He writes about that in his newly translated memoir, The Patagonian Hare.

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Opinion
3:06 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Trayvon Martin: The Lingering Memory Of Dead Boys

Attorney Benjamin Crump speaks to the medial, holding cellphone records and a police report. He represents the family of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin, who was was killed by neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman on Feb. 26 in Sanford, Fla.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 20, 2012 5:05 pm

Tayari Jones has written for McSweeney's, The New York Times and The Believer. Her most recent book is Silver Sparrow.

Like many Americans, I have been glued to the television eager for details about the tragic murder of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin. I am not sure what I hoped to discover, as each new piece of evidence is more disturbing than the last.

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Weather
3:04 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Tuesday Forecast - 3/20

Happy Vernal Equinox, UPR listeners! It's officially spring, and the cold snap will be gone faster than you can say "frozen tulips".

The Two-Way
2:59 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Southern Miss Revokes Scholarships Of Band Members For 'Green Card' Chant

The University of Southern Mississippi announced that it took disciplinary action against five of its pep band members today.

The five students were involved in one of the more controversial moments of the NCAA tournament, when they chanted "Where's your green card?" as Angel Rodriguez, a Latino player from Kansas State, took a free throw.

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Sports
2:48 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

The Rodeo Circuit: Bucking Bulls And Broken Bones

Two bullfighters are tossed by the bull Jumpin Jack Flash during the 2006 Professional Bull Riders World Finals in Las Vegas.
Donald Miralle Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 8:56 am

It's spring, and that means rodeo season is ramping up, especially in the American West. Some professional cowboys will soon be competing almost every night in bull riding, calf roping or steer wrestling.

But along with the trophy buckles and cash prizes, cowboys also bring home injuries — some of them severe. Some rodeo events are more dangerous, and less lucrative, than football and other contact sports.

An Unsteady Paycheck

The 2012 Houston Rodeo begins with a prayer and the national anthem, followed by the first event: calf roping.

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It's All Politics
2:48 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Robert De Niro's Racial First-Lady Joke Was An Obama No-No

Actor Robert De Niro with his wife, Grace Hightower, in Washington, D.C., on Dec. 4, 2011.
Michael Tran Getty Images

Maybe Robert De Niro didn't know. Or maybe he forgot.

But when the superstar actor joked at a New York Obama campaign fundraiser Monday evening which Michelle Obama attended about the country not being ready for a white first lady, he got into dangerous territory for President Obama.

According to an Obama campaign pool report, De Niro deadpanned:

"Callista Gingrich. Karen Santorum. Ann Romney. Now do you really think our country is ready for a white first lady?"

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Middle East
2:43 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Turkey Resists Calls To Arm Syrian Rebels

Syrians living in Turkey and human-rights activists stage a protest on Feb. 4 outside the Syrian consulate in Istanbul to condemn the killings in Syria. Calls are growing louder for Turkey to intervene in the violence in neighboring Syria by helping the rebels and civilians there.
Anonymous AP

Originally published on Tue March 20, 2012 4:15 pm

The rising civilian death toll in Syria is accompanied by mounting calls to arm the Syrian opposition. And Turkey, a NATO country that shares a long, rugged border with Syria, is often mentioned as a likely transit point.

Turkey has become increasingly critical of the Syrian regime, but Ankara is thus far reluctant to send significant arms across the border or use its large military to create a humanitarian corridor inside Syria.

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